About Leanne

Artist and animator based in England. Recently graduated from University with a degree in Multimedia. A geek of everything, but mostly fantasy, sci-fi and computers.

YOU DO NOT REQUIRE TEA?

Ever since the first LEGO Star Wars game came out, I’ve been trying to make a 3D recreation of a LEGO minifig that has the same range of movement – bendable legs, arms, hands, that sort of thing. Then I found this custom LEGO model of a Dalek by Flickr user kaptainkobold. I thought “why not?” and with the help of the LDraw library (open source virtual LEGO pieces) made a virtual version.

The result was a homage to the Doctor wailing on a Dalek with a wrench in a recent episode:

The Daleks aren’t having much luck with serving tea, are they?

Client Project – Final Covers

I’ve now handed in the final versions of my covers for ImagineFX.

Deus Est Machina

Thanks to the addition of some blurring, textures overlays and image adjustments the final image looks really awesome. My brother was especially impressed, and asked if the machine depicted was a Necron C’tan (a being from Warhammer 40,000). I’m rather glad that my Kodak printer is really good with colour handling, because the CYMK preview in Photoshop wasn’t looking good if I’m honest.

Draconic Shaman

This one errs more towards my usual art style. The initial version didn’t have such stark lighting in it as this one, and there are extra details added to the outfit. I was very pleased to be commended by my client on how good my rendering and design of the head dress though, because if there’s one thing I pride myself on, it’s attention to detail.

Client Project – Both Covers

I’ve sent off both covers to my client for feedback. Here’s the small, water-marked versions of the two.

Some cosmetic changes will need to be done obviously, but the question is whether I need actual prints to hand in or not. Hopefully not, it would be rather awkward trying to find a print shop that could print A0 in time.

Also, in the process of making sure I have evidence to show my work on these, I’ve lost count of the amount of file versions I’ve made of these two (and that’s not including aborted ones). It’s a good thing my filing system is the only thing of mine that’s reasonably organised.

I’m currently going through my artwork folder to find images for the exhibition package. It’s a bit odd that some of them are a couple of years old, but they actually still demonstrate my skillset. And I haven’t even gotten started on my 3D work (I need to rig the 3D minifig I’ve been working on for that, shouldn’t take too long – I can practically rig in my sleep now).

Quick Client update

One of the covers is nearly ready for sending off to my client for a final once-over – the other I’ve started from scratch by revisiting one of my original concepts and so will take a little longer.

I found some really neat cloud brushes on DeviantART, so I’ll be using them on the nebula. Also, ignore the grey box, that’s a guide fot the space ship.

Client Project Update 2

First off: following last week’s PRP lecture, where the research project being discussed was practically the same as mine with a different title, I’ve done a rethink of my current and upcoming artefacts and come up with a game plan – however, this did leave me with not as much time as I’d like to get responses for my current artefact, so I’m planning on proposing my presentation till next week. Also, I’ve caught a chest cold which has rendered it a bit difficult to talk for prolonged periods without getting wheezy and start coughing. I really want to get this right, and if that means pushing things back a week then so be it.

Onto Client, and I will admit it’s been a little neglected due to the PRP (my brain goes into a certain mode and doesn’t come out of it for a few days; it gets a little tiresome at times). But I am entering the final stages before sending them off to my client for a final once-over, so you’re getting a backlog update.

My client thought the second cover design was the strongest of the two, but was a little concerned about the religious imagery being a little too overt. So I went for the idea of it being a huge machine of some sort in a nebula billowing gas and creating new stars. I also added in a spacecraft to give a better sense of scale (i.e.: this thing is huge).

I always seem to lean towards to the surreal when it comes to things like this, and as I was sketching a design for the machine I decided to make its face resemble The Scream, with the open mouth having gas pouring from sort of like the “breath of life.”

I started blocking the shape in for the robot which is coming out really well. But at some point, I’m not sure when exactly, I looked at it and thought the composition was off, so I shrank everything so that it wasn’t taking up most of the frame. The colour of the robot is bothering me a lot though, and I think I need to make it blend into the colour of the nebula more since the idea is to have it mostly shrouded in gas.

For the other cover, my client was concerned that the two were too similar in theme (he was right; as previously mentioned my brain goes into a certain mode and refuses to come out of it), and gave a few suggestions to explore. One of them was “if dragons developed a society what would a member of a religious order look like?” There are no prizes for guessing what happened next – especially after I realised that I had already been playing with the same idea for the past few years in my spare time. I’ve been actively avoiding dragons in my work these past three years (not counting my Norse myth board game which had a couple), but by this point I’ve really begun to miss having the opportunity to paint huge “badass” dragons so I leapt at the chance and immediately sat down to work through the idea in my sketchbook:

It ought to be noted that when it comes to dragons I tend to avoid giving them armour and such – I’m rather logical with these kinds of things and the question keeps popping up as to how they would craft them in the first place seeing as they haven’t the hands for it. Also, much like a stag or gorilla, it makes sense that they would more likely grow any signs of status as part of their biology rather than use adornments.

I tend to have problems with foreshortening in my art (I’ve never been able to judge distance very well), so I make use of DAZ Studio to act as a reference model (no pun intended). The tie into the religion theme is that it’s pulling itself out of a temple (maybe it’s been stuck there, maybe it’s its cave with a fancy entrance; it could be either), hence the doorway visible at the back.

Also: DAZ Studio is the only program I have ever encountered that saves backwards. I’m not joking, the progress bar actually goes the wrong way at one point.

I was a bit annoyed with the pose I originally decided on, seeing as I’ve actually seen it a number of times in artwork. So I altered the angle (note: it is very hard to get any sort of sense of motion in these models). I did like the idea that it’s also using its wings to pull itself out of its hole, so that stayed in. Originally the mouth was closed because dragons with their mouths open are, to put it mildly, a bit overdone. But it just looked too passive, and passive isn’t a word I’d associate with a dragon of this design. So I did a reference with the mouth open as well.

The next 4 shots are various stages of the blocking (Wings 3D was used to create a rough horn as it was a pain to judge the perspective on it). The statues are very obviously a copy-and-paste job, but the head on the far one either needs reworking, or it gets hidden by the far wing (the latter is looking increasingly likely). The open mouth is still only half done as it’s rather tricky to sort out the angle of the bottom jaw. The neck needs reworking to add more tension into it, as does the far paw – I need to change it so it’s digging its claws into the step. I think I’ll also add in the remains of the head of the near statue as well to add something to the bottom of the image as it’s looking rather bare.

For the doorway, I’m currently looking these for reference:

The idea is to make the detail on the door look like it was carved with claws – meaning the detail isn’t as fine as the images here.

SPP3 – Assignment One

So, for the first assignment for SPP3 I have to find four full-time multimedia jobs, four full-time post-graduate courses, and “mock” apply (as in write out the paper work but not actually send it) to one of each.

Task A: Multimedia Jobs

This was tricky, seeing as most jobs usually ask for a couple years of experience; if you’re good at searching though, you can find ones that don’t have it listed as a firm requirement. I narrowed the results down to four via a combination of realism (no “Senior” positions for a first-time job – I learnt that when I attempted to apply for a job at Linneys Design near where I live about 4 years ago. Obviously, I am older and wiser now).

After careful consideration – and realising that the fact I don’t have a passport would be, to put it lightly, problematic (yes, I know we aren’t actually applying for these, but it’s still something to factor in considering how many jobs are overseas), I “applied” for the role of Game Artist at Playfish. Since I obviously don’t have the previous experience it lists as being a plus, I did my best to make my covering letter as interesting as possible (you’ll be glad to know that it’s a marked improvement from the last one I did – this time I actually have some idea of what I’m doing).

Task B: Post-graduate Courses

This one is somewhat unfair considering I’m an overly curious academic at heart, meaning there are a lot of courses I would be interested in studying. But I did eventually narrow it down to four.

Of the courses, I decided I would mock-apply for the Escape Studios Animation course. Not only would it make it even more likely I would get a job, the subject matter it would teach would be invaluable; I already know a lot about 3D modelling and texture, so I would really like to focus solely on the animation instead of having to construct my characters and rig them first. The downside, of course, is that it costs £8,750, and whilst the reaction of my parents would be amusing, that’s not something I’m about to tell them.

Another thing that’s come out of this:- my CV has improved ten-fold. I found the old one I had uploaded at Monster.co.uk the other day, and lets just say that it did seemrather amateurish (mind you, it did get me an interview for a position in the local paper’s main office, so it can’t have been that bad).